A

Letter A: Displaying 261 - 280 of 2517
ɑːkɑtɬ
Orthographic Variants: 
ācatl, aca

a reed or cane; also, a calendrical marker (used as both a day name and a year name), and a personal name; these reeds were made into darts and arrows; in hieroglyphs the acatl takes on a number of different visual forms

reed grass

cane fields, cane plantation (see Molina)

a place name; place of reeds; a tlaxilacalli of Xoloco, a part of Mexico City (central Mexico, 1613)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 252–253.

Orthographic Variants: 
acatlatzaqualli

cane or reed fence
Luis Reyes García, Eustaquio Celestino Solís, Armando Valencia Ríos, et al, Documentos nauas de la Ciudad de México del siglo XVI (Mexico City: Centro de Investigación y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social y Archivo General de la Nación, 1996), 136.

the name or title of a high judge (see Sahagún)

a person's name (attested male in Cuernavaca, sixteenth century)

Orthographic Variants: 
acatlohtli

Bat Falcon (a bird); see Hunn, in attestations

ɑkɑtto
Orthographic Variants: 
acattopa, yacatopa

first (see Karttunen)

ɑkɑttopɑ

first (see Karttunen)

ɑːkɑtsɑnɑtɬ

Slender-billed Grackle (a bird); see Hunn, in attestations

Orthographic Variants: 
acaxcaua

who is the owner of this? (a question) (see Molina)

ɑːkɑʃilki

a scroll design
Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 2 -- The Ceremonies, no. 14, Part III, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1951), 71.

ɑːkɑʃitɬ

pool, watering trough (see Molina and Karttunen)

Orthographic Variants: 
Ācaxōch

a woman's name; in the Historia Tolteca Chichimeca, she is mentioned as being a wife (zohuatl), apparently of a tlahtoani
(sixteenth century, Quauhtinchan)
Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca, eds. Paul Kirchhoff, Lina Odena Güemes, y Luis Reyes García (México: CISINAH, INAH-SEP, 1976), 152.

also, Reed-flower; in the Treatise, another way of saying deer (Atenango, between Mexico City and Acapulco, 1629)
Hernando Ruiz de Alarcón, Treatise on the Heathen Superstitions That Today Live Among the Indians Native to This New Spain, 1629, eds. and transl. J. Richard Andrews and Ross Hassig (Norman and London: University of Oklahoma Press, 1984), 220.

an aquatic flower that comes in red or white, with many petals, a tuberous base with green foliage; of the lobelia family

Orthographic Variants: 
acaxoxouhquj

green maize stalks
Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 2 -- The Ceremonies, No. 14, Part III, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1951), 78.

ɑːkɑʃtoːntɬi

a fountain with water (see Molina)

Orthographic Variants: 
acaietl

a type of cane or reed filled with (or dipped into) aromatic substances (see Molina) to produce incense or perfume; could be put in the mouth to freshen breath (SW)

for a cultivated field to turn to weeds, or become full of reeds (see Molina)

for a field to revert to reeds, canes (see Molina)