T

Letter T: Displaying 121 - 140 of 13448
Orthographic Variants: 
t

when words ending in these consonants are in applicative, the "t" and "tz" may become "ch":

to come (attaches to a verb, to come doing that action)

came; on a verb = to cause something do do or be that thing

-tsɑːlɑn

between, among, in the midst of (see Lockhart and Karttunen)

(the contraction of -tzine vocative)

reverential suffix for nouns, also sometimes diminutive, or implying pity or tenderness
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 240.

-tsinko

this locative suffix, typically used with place names, was long thought to refer to the "little" or "lower" version of another community, but Frances Karttunen suggests "New ____," saying it should be read as a spin-off community
Frances Karttunen, unpublished manuscript, used here with her permission.

-tsiːneːwkɑ
Orthographic Variants: 
-tzīnēuhca

the beginning of something (see Karttunen), a necessarily possessed form

common ending used w/ preterite or command forms in conjunction w/ use of causative or applicative (-tia, -ltia, -ilia, -lilia) in the reverential sense

-tsinoɑː

reverential ending used with verbs already in the reflexive

-tsiːnpɑn
Orthographic Variants: 
-tzīnpan

one’s waist (see Karttunen), a necessarily possessed form

-tsiːntetʃ
Orthographic Variants: 
-tzīntech

postposition next to the base of something (see Karttunen)

-tsiːntɬɑn

beneath, below, at the foot of (see Karttunen and Lockhart)

-tsintɬi

honorific or diminutive (this is a compounding element that brings a reverential sense and sometimes a diminutive sense to a noun with which it is combined) (see Karttunen)

a plural reverential suffix (see Siméon)

a plural reverential suffix (see Siméon)

the head (typically possessed)

-tsontɬɑn

compound postposition at the head of one’s bed (see Karttunen)

when preceded by a number, multiples of four hundred

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 241.

or, when preceded by a modifier such as turquoise or feathers, this refers to a headdress (see attestations)

-tsopeːlikɑː
Orthographic Variants: 
-tzopēlicā

the sweetness of something, a necessarily possessed form (see Karttunen)